Chicago, IL, USA
November 8-10, 2018

All events are free and open to the public
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SPEAKERS

David Brody

Professor of Design Studies, Parsons School of Design Do Not Disturb: Design, Controversy, and Work at Chicago's Hyatt Regency > bio

Tom Burtonwood

Assistant Professor of Contemporary Practices, School of the Art Institute of Chicago Roundtable: Contemporary Practices and Design History > bio

Danielle Choi

Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design The Landscape of Infrastructure: Jens Jensen and Chicago’s Sanitary & Ship Canal > bio

Lizabeth Cohen

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Harvard University Consuming Chicago Design > bio

Penelope Dean

Associate Professor of Architecture, University of Illinois at Chicago Strictly Business: A Working Definition of Chicago’s Design, 1978-1997 > bio

Chris Dingwall

Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology, Oakland University AfriCOBRA and the History of Black Design in Chicago > bio

D. Denenge Duyst-Akpem

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art History, Theory, and Criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago Roundtable: Contemporary Practices and Design History > bio

Paul F. Gehl

Curator Emeritus, The Newberry Library Ludlow’s Mutt and Jeff: Douglas McMurtrie, Robert Middleton, and Chicago Type Design > bio

Neil Harris

Preston and Sterling Morton Professor Emeritus of History and Art History, University of Chicago Hidden in Plain View: Chicago's WPA Poster Designers > bio

Rebecca Houze

Professor of Art and Design History, Northern Illinois University The Fred Harvey Company and the Atchinson, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad in Chicago > bio

Barbara Jaffee

Professor Emerita of Art History, Northern Illinois University The Two Traditions: Chicago’s Schools of Art and Architecture Reconsidered > bio

Barbara Karant

Photographer, Chicago, IL Roundtable: Contemporary Practices and Design History > bio

Paul Kruty

Professor Emeritus of Architectural History, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (Re)presenting the New Chicago Architecture, 1900-1930 > bio

Anca Lasc

Assistant Professor of History of Art and Design, Pratt Institute Chicago, Center of the Window Design World > bio

Craig Lee

PhD Candidate in Art History, University of Delaware Federal Electric Company and Chicago’s “Spectacular” Skyline, c. 1930 > bio

Thomas Leslie

Morrill Professor of Architecture, Iowa State University Encoding Design: Chicago’s 1951 Building Code and the Postwar Skyscraper > bio

Vernon Lockhart

Executive Director of Project Osmosis Roundtable: Contemporary Practices and Design History > bio

Paula Lupkin

Assistant Professor of Design History, University of North Texas Cornering Capital: The Board of Trade and the Federal Reserve at LaSalle and Jackson > bio

Olivia Mahoney

Senior Curator, Chicago History Museum Mail Order Modern > bio

Victoria Matranga

Independent Scholar, Chicago, IL Women Designers in Chicago, 1940-1965 > bio

Jonathan Mekinda

Assistant Professor of Design History, University of Illinois at Chicago Icons, Emblems, and Types: Designing Chicago Design > bio

Joanna Merwood-Salisbury

Professor of Architecture and Associate Dean at the Faculty of Architecture and Design, Victoria University of Wellington Thorstein Veblen at Hull House: The Labor Museum and the Evolution of the Industrial Arts in Chicago > bio

Amani Morrison

Postdoctoral Fellow in African and African American Studies, Washington University Modern by Design: Chicago's Kitchenettes and Black Spatial Affordance > bio

Jenni Sorkin

Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture, University of California, Santa Barbara Textile Networks in Chicago, 1940-1970 > bio

Marin Sullivan

Independent Scholar, Chicago, IL Sculpting Corporate Display: Harry Bertoia and Richard Lippold in 1950s Chicago > bio

Maggie Taft

Independent Scholar, Chicago, IL Roundtable: Contemporary Practices and Design History > bio

Gretchen Von Koenig

Independent Scholar, New York, NY Chicago and the Precedent of Design Education: Pedagogy, Curricula, and Capitalist Influences > bio

E. James West

Lecturer and Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in American History, Northumbria University “A Poem in Marble and Glass:” Designing Racial Uplift at 820 Michigan Avenue > bio

Richard Guy Wilson

Commonwealth Professor’s Chair in Architectural History, University of Virginia Art Deco and the Chicago Board of Trade > bio

David Brody

Professor of Design Studies, Parsons School of Design

David Brody is a Professor of Design Studies at Parsons School of Design, a division of the New School. He is the author of Visualizing American Empire: Orientalism and Imperialism in the Philippines (Chicago, 2010) as well as Housekeeping by Design: Hotels and Labor (Chicago, 2016). David is also the co-editor of Design Studies: A Reader (Berg, 2009). David teaches a range of courses at Parsons, including American Art, Theorizing Luxury, and Topics in American Design. He received his undergraduate degree in American Studies from Vassar College and his Ph.D. in American Studies from Boston University.

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Tom Burtonwood

Assistant Professor of Contemporary Practices, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Tom Burtonwood explores sight, how we interpret sight and how sight changes through technology. They use a multiplicity of viewpoints as a strategy for comparative study of perceptual phenomena through installation, video, sculpture and drawing. Burtonwood (b. United Kingdom) is a Chicago-based multidisciplinary artist, curator and educator. They hold an MFA from Southern Illinois University and a BA from Loughborough College of Art (UK). They have exhibited nationally and  internationally including 6018North, Chicago; Bert Green Fine Art, Chicago; Printed Matter, NY; Chicago Cultural Center; Hyde Park Art Center, Chicago; Riverside Art Center, IL; CICA Museum Gyeonggi-do, Korea; DEMO Project, Springfield; Terrain Biennial 2017, Oak Park. Their work is included the holdings many libraries and collections including, The Metropolitan Museum of Art Thomas J Watson Library; The Boston Athanaeum, Boston;The Insitut for Aestetik, Aarhus, Denmark; Yale University Library, New Haven; MIT Library, Cambridge and The Joan Flasch Artist Book Collection, School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Danielle Choi

Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, Harvard Graduate School of Design

Danielle Choi is an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD). Her research concerns infrastructure and the public realm in American cities in the early 20th century. During this era, civil waterworks and public parks co-authored multiple narratives of environmental control, ecological crisis, and regional disposition. Currently, work on these issues concerns the entangled histories of Chicago’s wastewater infrastructure and the downstream Illinois River Valley, as well as the politics of contemporary landscape preservation in living environments. Choi teaches in the core landscape studio sequence and leads design research seminars. Prior to joining the GSD, she taught studio in urban design at Columbia University. Choi is a licensed landscape architect in the state of New York, and was a senior associate at Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates in New York City, where she led strategy and design of complex urban landscapes and managed large, multi-disciplinary teams. Choi also worked as a designer at Topotek in Berlin. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Art History from the University of Chicago and a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the GSD.

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Lizabeth Cohen

Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and Howard Mumford Jones Professor of American Studies, Harvard University

Lizabeth Cohen is a Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor and the Howard Mumford Jones Professor American Studies in the Department of History. She recently served for seven years as the Dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. Cohen is the author of Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919-1939 (1990, new edition with new introduction 2008; Canto Classic 2015), winner of the Bancroft Prize and a finalist for the Pulitzer, and A Consumers’ Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America (2003).  Her interests have recently focused on urbanism and the built environment. She is currently finishing a new book, Saving America's Cities:  Ed Logue and the Struggle to Renew Urban America in the Suburban Age (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, forthcoming 2019), which explores shifting strategies in the rebuilding of American cities after World War II by following the career of a major figure in urban renewal, Edward J. Logue, who worked in New Haven in the 1950s, Boston in the 1960s, and New York City and State from 1968-1985.  She is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. She received her A.B. from Princeton University and her Ph.D. from the University of California Berkeley.

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Penelope Dean

Associate Professor of Architecture, University of Illinois at Chicago

Penelope Dean is Associate Professor at the UIC School of Architecture, where she serves as coordinator of the Master of Arts in Design Criticism program. Her research focuses on contemporary architectural culture with an emphasis on the exchanges between architecture and the allied design fields from the late 1970s onwards. Dean’s writings have appeared in Architectural DesignJournal of Architectural EducationHarvard Design MagazineLog, hunch, Praxis, and Flat Out, and her work supported by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts and a visiting scholars residency at the Canadian Centre for Architecture Montreal. She holds a Ph.D from UCLA in Critical Studies of Architectural Culture and has served in various editorial capacities for hunchContentKM3, and Crib Sheets. She is founding editor of Flat Out.

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Chris Dingwall

Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology, Oakland University

Chris is a historian of race and the economy in American culture. He received his PhD in US History from the University of Chicago, and recently finished a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Toronto. Currently he is writing a book, "Selling Slavery: Race and the Industry of American Culture" (under contract at Cambridge University Press); and curating an exhibition, "African American Designers in Chicago: Art, Commerce, and the Politics of Race," which will run at the Chicago Cultural Center from November 2018 to March 2019 with support from the Terra Foundation for American Art. He lives in Detroit and lectures on race, mass culture, and social theory at Oakland University.

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D. Denenge Duyst-Akpem

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art History, Theory, and Criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

D. Denenge Duyst-Akpem is a space sculptor whose visual art, writing, performance, and teaching bridge disciplines of site-specific, ritual, public art, interior design, ecology, and Afro-Futurism.  She meticulously constructs fantastical interactive Afri-sci-fi environments and performances that interrogate, titillate, decolonize, and empower, rooted in Sun Ra's transformational legacy, asking "Who controls the future?"  Her practice is concerned with themes of incarceration and liberation; surviving and thriving in the apocalyptic landscape; environmental consciousness; and value, repulsion, and beauty in representations of Black women. Duyst-Akpem is Adjunct Assistant Professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism and Low-Residency MFA Program, Undergraduate Division, and faculty advisor at CAPX. She founded Denenge Design and In The Luscious Garden, focused on holistic and conceptual approaches to human-centered design.  Exhibition and performance venues include: Library of Congress, Schomburg Center, Arts Club of Chicago, MCA, Red Bull Arts NY. Interviews, articles, features include: ArtNews, Newsweek, Sixty, How We Get To Next.  Duyst-Akpem is the recipient of an SAIC DAG inaugural 2016 Teaching Award for Excellence in Diversity and Inclusion and a 2014 NEH Fellowship.  She received her MFA from SAIC and BA from Smith College

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Paul F. Gehl

Curator Emeritus, The Newberry Library

Paul F. Gehl is Curator Emeritus at the Newberry Library in Chicago. He retired in 2016 after thirty years as Custodian of the John M. Wing Foundation, the Newberry’s special collection on history of printing, calligraphy, and the book. He is an historian (Ph.D. Chicago 1976) who has published on textbook history, Chicago calligraphy and design, and the history of the book trade. In recent years his research has concentrated on the history of American book collecting, but he also maintains a monographic website entitled Humanism For Sale: Making and Marketing Schoolbooks in Italy, 1450-1650 (www.humanismforsale.org).

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Neil Harris

Preston and Sterling Morton Professor Emeritus of History and Art History, University of Chicago

Neil Harris joined the University of Chicago faculty in 1969, and taught there until 2008, when he retired as Preston and Sterling Morton Professor Emeritus in the departments of History and Art History and the Committee on Geographical Studies. His books include The Artist in American Society; Cultural Excursions: Marketing Appetites and Cultural Tastes in Modern AmericaBuilding Lives. Constructing Rites and Passages; and The Chicagoan: A Lost Magazine of the Jazz Age among others. Cultural Capital: J. Carter Brown, the National Gallery of Art, and the Reinvention of  the Museum Experience was published in the fall of 2013. The following year, with his wife, he published En Guerre: French Illustrators and World War I. Harris has held named lectureships at Yale, Princeton, John Hopkins, Columbia, and Stanford Universities. In 1990 he received the Joseph Henry Medal of the Smithsonian Institution, and since 1993 he has been a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  In 1999-2000 he held a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship.  In 2008 he received the Lawrence A. Fleischman Award from the Archives of American Art and in 2010 the Iris Foundation Award for contributions to the decorative arts, and a Mellon Emeritus Fellowship.

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Rebecca Houze

Professor of Art and Design History, Northern Illinois University

Rebecca Houze is Professor of Art and Design History at Northern Illinois University. Her current research considers relationships between world's fairs and the design of national parks and open-air museums in both Europe and North America in the early twentieth century. She is particularly interested in narratives of national identity as expressed in dress, architecture, and the design of the environment, as well as histories of travel, collections, and exhibitions. These topics are explored in her books Textiles, Fashion, and Design Reform in Austria-Hungary Before the First World War: Principles of Dress (Ashgate, 2015) and New Mythologies in Design and Culture: Reading Signs and Symbols in the Visual Landscape (Bloomsbury, 2016). She has contributed more recently to the volumes Expanding Nationalism at World’s Fairs: Identity, Diversity, and Exchange, 1851-1915, edited by David Raizman and Ethan Robey (Routledge, 2018), and Design Dialogue: Jews, Culture, and Viennese Modernism, edited by Elana Shapira (Böhlau, 2018). Professor Houze is co-editor with Grace Lees-Maffei of The Design History Reader (Berg, 2010), and serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Design History.

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Barbara Jaffee

Professor Emerita of Art History, Northern Illinois University

Barbara Jaffee is Professor Emerita of Art History at Northern Illinois University, DeKalb. Prior to joining the faculty at NIU, she earned a M.F.A. in Painting and taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago for more than a decade. Barbara began her study of art history at the University of Illinois at Chicago, completing a Ph.D. in Art History at the University of Chicago in 1999. She is the recipient of several grants and awards, including a J. Paul Getty Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship in Art History and the Humanities in 2005. Barbara is interested in unconventional narratives of the origins and development of modernism in the United States, particularly those in which the practices of fine arts and design are recognized as deeply integrated with one another. Her essays have appeared in a number of journals and anthologies, including Art Journal and Design Issues. Barbara is currently completing a book on the use of diagrams in art and art historical pedagogy as a vehicle for the diffusion of modernist aesthetics in the United States.

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Barbara Karant

Photographer, Chicago, IL

Barbara Karant is an internationally recognized photographer. She is known in the design, art, and architecture communities for the artistic beauty and photographic quality she demands in her work. Trained at RISD (BFA) and SAIC (MFA), she has photographed for a range of notable architects, interior and graphic designers, and manufacturers based in the US and abroad. Karant's commissioned photography has been widely published. Her images have appeared in Architecture Magazine, Interior Design, Metropolis, Domus, Architectural Record, Esquire, Bark, Chicago Magazine, Interiors and The New York Times. Her art photography has been published in a variety of anthologies, and photography and art blogs. Three books of her work have been published—Within The Fairy Castle, Museum of Science and Industry; Greyhounds, Abrams Books; Small Dog Big Dog, Simon & Schuster. Barbara Karant’s photography is represented in numerous private and permanent collections including those of The Minneapolis Institute of the Arts, The Art Institute of Chicago, The St. Louis Art Museum, The Stanford University Art Museum, The Sheldon Museum of Art, and The Chrysler Museum. Her photography has been exhibited throughout the US and Europe. Barbara has taught at Loyola University, Harrington College of Design, and Columbia College. She mentors, critiques, consults, and speaks regularly about her photography to students and professionals alike.

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Paul Kruty

Professor Emeritus of Architectural History, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Paul Kruty is a leading expert on the architects of the Prairie School, including Frank Lloyd Wright, Marion Mahony, Walter Burley Griffin and Robert Spencer. His books include Walter Burley Griffin in America (1996), Two American Architects in India: Walter B. Griffin and Marion M. Griffin, 1935-1937 (1997), Frank Lloyd Wright and Midway Gardens (1998), Marion Mahony and Millikin Place (2007), Walter Burley Griffin and the Stinson Memorial Library (2010), and he served as editor and contributor to Rock Crest/Rock Glen: the American Masterwork of Marion M. and Walter B. Griffin (2014).  His essay on Marion Mahony’s drawings for Wright (2011) for the first time provided a comprehensive framework for understanding her accomplishment.  His many articles range from studies of the world’s first architectural licensing law, the context of Wright’s designs for the Arts-and-Crafts book House Beautiful, and the architectural development of Chicago’s Gold Coast neighborhood, to the role of the casement window in early modern architecture and the arrival of Modern art to America’s Midwest. Professor Kruty received a B.A. from the University of Chicago and earned his Ph.D. at Princeton University. He is Professor Emeritus of Architectural History at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

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Anca Lasc

Assistant Professor of History of Art and Design, Pratt Institute

Dr. Lasc studies the invention and commercialization of the modern French interior and the development of the professions of interior designer and window dresser. She has published widely on these topics. Her book, Designing the French Interior: The Modern Home and Mass Media, co-edited with Georgina Downey and Mark Taylor, was published by Bloomsbury in 2015 (paperback 2017) while Visualizing the Nineteenth-Century Home: Modern Art and the Decorative Impulse was released by Routledge in May 2016 (paperback 2018). Architectures of Display: Department Stores and Modern Retail, co-edited with Patricia Lara-Betancourt and Margaret Maile Petty was published by Routledge in 2017. Her monograph, Interior Decorating in Nineteenth-Century France: The Visual Culture of a New Profession, will be published by Manchester University Press, Studies in Design and Material Culture Series, in August 2018.

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Craig Lee

PhD Candidate in Art History, University of Delaware

Craig Lee focuses on the history of modern architecture and design. He is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Art History at the University of Delaware. His dissertation is an architectural history of outdoor advertising and signage in twentieth-century America with special attention to the visual politics of the city skyline. His research has been recognized with support from the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Huntington Library, Getty Research Institute, and Duke University, among others. He also has museum experience from positions at the Museum of the City of New York, Princeton University Art Museum, Fallingwater, Museum of Modern Art, and elsewhere. He received an MA from the Bard Graduate Center and a BA from Dartmouth College.

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Thomas Leslie

Morrill Professor of Architecture, Iowa State University

Thomas Leslie is the Morrill Professor in Architecture at Iowa State University, where he teaches building history, technology, and design.  He is the author of Chicago Skyscrapers, 1871-1934Beauty's Rigor: Patterns of Production in the Work of Pier Luigi Nervi, and Louis I. Kahn: Building Art, Building Science, all of which explore the integration of engineering, construction, and architectural design.  He has held visiting positions at Northwestern University, the Università di Bologna, and the University of Technology-Sydney.  He was the 2013 recipient of the Booth Family Rome Prize in Historic Preservation, and he is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects.

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Vernon Lockhart

Executive Director of Project Osmosis

Vernon Lockhart is Executive Director of Project Osmosis, an education and mentoring initiative that emerged from the Chicago chapter of the Organization of Black Designers (OBD). Sharing a mission with OBD to increase dialogue and interaction between aspiring designers and the professional world, Lockhart has directed Osmosis toward mentoring young creative minds. Osmosis programs foster a generation of confident makers by engaging minority youth in activities that promote creativity and self-expression. The organization helps more than 400 students each year to gain access and knowledge about career opportunities in the design disciplines. Lockhart is also founder and principal of Art on the Loose (AOTL), a creative consulting firm specializing in exhibition design and brand identity. Clients of AOTL include Bronzeville Children’s Museum, Chicago Community Trust, Communities In Schools of Chicago, DuSable Museum of African American History, Museum of Science and Industry, Newberry Library, and Northwestern University. The firm’s work has been recognized by Communications Arts, Graphic Design USA, Graphis, and Print.  Active on all fronts of design advocacy, Lockhart has served as on the local and national boards of AIGA, and before establishing Osmosis, was Executive Director of OBD Chicago (1997–2007). Lockhart was also instrumental in helping UIC to establish the UIC Osmosis Charles Harrison Scholarship.

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Paula Lupkin

Assistant Professor of Design History, University of North Texas

Paula Lupkin, assistant professor at the University of North Texas, is a historian of design, architecture, and cities.  Her interdisciplinary work focuses on the spatial production of modernity under capitalism, investigating its impact on the designed world and the built environment. Her research and publications, including Manhood Factories: YMCA Architecture and the Making of Modern Urban Culture (University of Minnesota Press, 2010) and Shaping the American Interior: Contexts, Structures, and Practices (Routledge, 2018), co-edited with Penny Sparke, address the ways that architecture, interiors, cities, and landscapes shaped and were shaped by new ways of living, working, designing, and consuming. Her work has been supported by the Charles Warren Center at Harvard, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Study in the Fine Arts, and the Clements Center for Southwestern Studies at Southern Methodist University.

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Olivia Mahoney

Senior Curator, Chicago History Museum

Olivia Mahoney is Senior Curator at the Chicago History Museum where she has worked since 1980. Her primary responsibility is to collect, research, and interpret Chicago and American history for the general public. Her exhibitions and publications include A House Divided: America in the Age of Lincoln and America’s Reconstruction: People and Politics after the Civil War with Dr. Eric Foner, Go West: Chicago and American Expansion, Chicago: Crossroads of America, Abraham Lincoln Transformed and Shalom Chicago. Ms. Mahoney’s most recent effort is Modern by Design: Chicago Streamlines America, which will open on October 27, 2018. In addition, Ms. Mahoney has served as a grant reviewer for the National Endowment for the Humanities and as an advisor to the Gettysburg National Park museum and visitor center. Ms. Mahoney holds a Bachelor’s degree in education and history from Northwestern University, and a Master’s degree in museum studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program, State University of New York.

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Victoria Matranga

Independent Scholar, Chicago, IL

Chicago native Victoria Matranga has a BA in the history of architecture and art (University of Illinois at Chicago) and a masters in marketing (Northwestern University). She completed the Summer Intensive in Design Writing and Research at the School of the Visual Arts. She has been an exhibition curator, researcher or writer for the Art Institute of Chicago, Toledo Museum of Art, Museum of Science and Industry, Kendall College and other institutions. She wrote America at Home: A Celebration of 20th-Century Housewares and contributed to The Alliance of Art and Industry: Toledo Designs for a Modern America, The Encyclopedia of Chicago, Art Deco Chicago: Designing Modern America and other books. She has lectured widely about Chicago’s industrial design history and is working on a book about Chicago design 1940-1970. She is the design history columnist for INNOVATION, the quarterly journal of the Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA), and she serves on the boards of the Chicago Design Archive and the International Museum of Dinnerware Design. As Design Programs Coordinator for the International Housewares Association (IHA) since 1992, she organizes industry education events, displays and awards programs and writes articles for IHA’s blog.  She created and manages the IHA’s student design competition, now in its 26th year.

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Jonathan Mekinda

Assistant Professor of Design History, University of Illinois at Chicago

Jonathan Mekinda is a historian of architecture and design and an Assistant Professor in the School of Design at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His research focuses on the historical development of modern architecture and design during the middle decades of the twentieth century, particularly in Italy and the United States. Dr. Mekinda has received grants and awards from numerous organizations, among them the Fulbright Program, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, and the Terra Foundation for American Art, and his writing can be found in various publications, including the Journal of Design History, Design Issues, and Revival: Memories, Identities, Utopias (2015). Chicagoisms, which he co-edited with Alexander Eisenschmidt, was published by Park Books in 2013, and in 2014, they curated a related exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. In addition to several on-going projects related to Chicago, Dr. Mekinda is currently at work on his book, Building the “House of Man”: Design and the Modern Home in Milan, 1933-1957. He received his A.B. from Brown University and his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.

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Joanna Merwood-Salisbury

Professor of Architecture and Associate Dean at the Faculty of Architecture and Design, Victoria University of Wellington

Joanna Merwood-Salisbury is Professor of Architecture and Associate Dean at the Faculty of Architecture and Design, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. She has published widely on the history and historiography of the Chicago School of architecture, including Chicago 1890: The Skyscraper and the Modern City (2009); "The First Chicago School and the Ideology of the Skyscraper," in Peggy Deamer Ed. Architecture and Capitalism (2014); and "American Modern: The Chicago School and the International Style at New York’s Museum of Modern Art," in Alexander Eisenschmidt and Jonathan Mekinda Eds. Chicagoisms: The City as Catalyst for Architectural Speculation (2014). She is a former Book Review Editor for the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians and member of the editorial board of AA Files. Her current research explores the design of public spaces in early modern cities and the socio-political contexts in which they were conceptualized and used. This is the subject of her forthcoming book, Design for the Crowd: Patriotism and Protest in Union Square (University of Chicago Press). Joanna's work has been supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Graham Foundation, and the J. M. Kaplan Fund.

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Amani Morrison

Postdoctoral Fellow in African and African American Studies, Washington University

Amani Morrison is a Postdoctoral Fellow in African and African American Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. She received her Ph.D in African American and African Diaspora Studies from the University of California, Berkeley. Amani researches and teaches in the areas of 20th Century African American literature, race and space studies, performance studies, cultural studies, and the urban and digital humanities. She is writing the first cultural history of kitchenette apartments. Amani's research has been supported by the Mellon Foundation, the UC Consortium for Black Studies in CA, the Black Metropolis Research Consortium, and the University of Illinois at Chicago Library. Her work has appeared in Meridians and the Oxford African American National Biography.

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Jenni Sorkin

Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture, University of California, Santa Barbara

Jenni Sorkin is Associate Professor of History of Art & Architecture at University of California, Santa Barbara. She writes on the intersections between gender, material culture, and contemporary art. Her book, Live Form: Women, Ceramics and Community (University of Chicago Press, 2016) examines the confluence of gender, artistic labor, and the history of post-war ceramics. Recent projects include essays in Outliers and American Vanguard Art, Lynne Cooke, ed. (Washington D.C.: National Gallery of Art, 2018); in Art in Chicago: A History from the Fire to Now, Maggie Taft and Robert Cozzolino, eds. (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2018); and in the forthcoming Pattern & Decoration catalog (LA MOCA, 2019). She has published widely as an art critic in ArtforumArt JournalArt MonthlyEast of BorneoNU: The Nordic Art ReviewFrieze, the Journal of Modern CraftModern Painters and Third Text. In 2004, she received the Art Journal Award. Currently, she serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Modern Craft. She is the recipient of fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies (2014-15), the Center for Craft, Creativity, and Design (2012), the Getty Research Institute (2010-11), and the ACLS/Luce Fellowship in American Art (2008).

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Marin Sullivan

Independent Scholar, Chicago, IL

Marin R. Sullivan (PhD, University of Michigan) is a Chicago-based art historian and curator. Her primary research interests include the histories of modern and contemporary sculpture, and its interdisciplinary, intermedial dialogues with photography, design, and the built environment. Sullivan was most recently Assistant Professor of Art History at Keene State College in New Hampshire, and prior to her appointment served as the Henry Moore Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the University of Leeds. She is the author of Sculptural Materiality in the Age of Conceptualism (2017), numerous articles in publications including Art History, History of Photography, the Journal of Curatorial Studies, and Sculpture Journal, and is co-editor of Postwar Italian Art Today: Untying ‘the Knot’ (2018). She is currently at work on a new book project, Alloys: American Sculpture and Architecture at Midcentury, which has been supported by fellowships from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Sullivan is also co-curating a major retrospective exhibition on Harry Bertoia, scheduled to open at the Nasher Sculpture Center in 2019.

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Maggie Taft

Independent Scholar, Chicago, IL

Maggie Taft is an independent scholar and founding director of the Haddon Avenue Writing Institute, a community-based writing center for teenage girls. Before establishing the Institute, she earned a PhD in art history from the University of Chicago, where her dissertation "Making Danish Modern, 1945–1960" received the 2015 Dean's Distinguished Dissertation Award in the Humanities. From 2014–16 she served as Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Modeling Interdisciplinary Inquiry at Washington University in St. Louis. Taft's writing and reviews have appeared in many magazines and journals including Artforum, The Point, Texte Zur Kunste, Design and Culture, and The Journal of Design History. She is coeditor of Art in Chicago: From the Fire to Now (University of Chicago Press, 2018), the first single volume history of art in Chicago from the nineteenth century through the present day. Her book, The Chieftain and the Chair: Danish Design in Postwar America is under contract with the University of Chicago Press.

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Gretchen Von Koenig

Independent Scholar, New York, NY

Gretchen Von Koenig holds an M.A. in History of Design & Curatorial Studies from Parsons & Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and a BS in Industrial Design from New Jersey Institute of Technology. The focus of her research centers on both historical and contemporary pedagogical models employed in undergraduate design education, specifically the integration of critical studies to practical studio training. Her other research includes the effects of capitalism on design education and the design history canon, class & social identity issues found in everyday objects of mass production and the problematic labor forces that support them in a global economy. She teaches a variety of critical studies courses to students in product and interior design at Parsons, NJIT & Kean University.

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E. James West

Lecturer and Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in American History, Northumbria University

E. James West is a Lecturer and Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in American History at Northumbria University, UK. His research focuses primarily on the black press and black business history in the United States and diaspora. His first book, Ebony Magazine, Lerone Bennett, Jr., and Popular Black History (forthcoming with University of Illinois Press), examines the role of Ebony magazine in what Vincent Harding has described as the "modern black history revival" during the decades following World War II. He is currently completing a second monograph exploring the intersections of race, media, and the built environment in twentieth century Chicago. To find out more about his work go to www.ejameswest.com.

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Richard Guy Wilson

Commonwealth Professor’s Chair in Architectural History, University of Virginia

Richard Guy Wilson holds the Commonwealth Professor's Chair in Architectural History at the University of Virginia (Thomas Jefferson's University) in Charlottesville, Virginia. His specialty is the architecture, design and art of the 18th to the 20th century both in America and abroad. Wilson has received a number of academic honors, among them a Guggenheim fellowship, prizes for distinguished writing, and in 1986 he was made an honorary member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA). He has directed the Victorian Society’s Nineteenth Century Summer School since 1979 that has been located in Boston, Philadelphia and currently Newport, RI. He has served as an advisor and commentator for a number of television programs on PBS and A&E. A frequent lecturer for universities he has also published widely with many articles and reviews to his credit. Wilson has been the curator and author for major museum exhibitions such as The American Renaissance, 1876-1917, The Arts and Crafts Movement in America, The Machine Age in America, 1918-1941, and The Making of Virginia Architecture. He is the author or joint author of 16 books that deal with American and modern architecture. He has published extensively on Thomas Jefferson and The University of Virginia and is writing a book on Monticello.

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